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Newsletter

September 2021

  • Virare al tatto I, 2021
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 5
  • Size of image: 52,50 cm x 39,50 cm
  • Size: 76,00 cm x 55,80 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 800.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Virare al tatto II, 2021
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 5
  • Size of image: 52,50 cm x 39,50 cm
  • Size: 76,00 cm x 55,80 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 800.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Virare al tatto III, 2021
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 5
  • Size of image: 52,50 cm x 39,50 cm
  • Size: 76,00 cm x 55,80 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 800.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Virare al tatto IV, 2021
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 5
  • Size of image: 52,50 cm x 39,50 cm
  • Size: 76,00 cm x 55,80 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 800.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Virare al tatto V, 2021
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 5
  • Size of image: 52,50 cm x 39,50 cm
  • Size: 76,00 cm x 55,80 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 800.00
  • available
  • Inquiry

Una Szeemann's work Virare al tatto, which in Italian means “to veer through touch”, consists of five heliogravures produced in collaboration with master printer Arno Hassler at his Atelier de gravure in Moutier. The prints show constellations of light and shadow, cloud-like formations characterized by fine color gradations from bright white to deep black. Subtle nuances of bleariness and sharpness give the images an atmospheric feel, somewhere between earth, water and sky. Szeemann created the motifs by scattering sand on a thin glass plate and tracing patterns with her hands. In a process similar to the one of photogram, the glass plate then functioned as a positive film for exposing the printing plate. Thus, through the medium of heliogravure, the artist transformed her gestures into abstract, luminous volumes and spaces.

Traces of bodies and movements are recurring elements in Una Szeemann's multi-media, mostly installation work. These traces often stand for something invisible, subconscious. In this respect, the artist explores the opposing relationship between the psyche as a vast, internal thing and the body as its spatially as well as temporally limited carrier. Her interest lies in making visible what is intangible to the mind and what is difficult to convey with words. This is also reflected, for example, in the work Die verschobene Verdichtung eines Schläfers [The Displaced Condensation of a Sleeper] (2018). It consists of copper plates on which the artist has choreographically translated her dreams and recorded the body's movements through traces of oxidation. At the center of Szeemann's oeuvre is the contradiction of wanting to give form to the unconscious. In this respect, the materials used always play an important role. Be it fabric, leather, plaster, hair, or even sand, the chosen material possesses its own essence, which influences the forms that appear. The series Virare al tatto testifies to Szeemann's sculptural approach to matter in order to visualize phenomena such as disappearance. VH

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  • Berlin (C), 2021
  • direct flat printing
  • Edition of: 37
  • Size of image: 40,00 cm x 30,00 cm
  • Size: 40,00 cm x 30,00 cm
  • Production: Thomi Wolfensberger, Zurich
  • CHF 800.00
  • Sold
  • Inquiry
  • The work comes with a wallpaper and an artist book. Only available as a series together with the diptych
  • Berlin (A+B), 2021
  • direct flat printing
  • Edition of: 37
  • Size of image: 40,00 cm x 60,00 cm
  • Size: 40,00 cm x 60,00 cm
  • Production: Thomi Wolfensberger, Zurich
  • CHF 1440.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Diptych. The work includes a wallpaper and an artist book. Last works available

Shirana Shahbazi's new series of photographic works is conceived as an installation. The ensemble functions as a mural and consists of three photo-lithographs and a wallpaper produced by master printer Thomi Wolfensberger. Two lithographs were created as a diptych and the third one as a single piece. Shahbazi plays with the subject of a still life – a vase with five gerberas. The colors chosen for the works are subtle. The background and the base of the photos are respectively a light and dark gray, whereas the vase blazes in blue and the flowers in white and red. The artist incorporated a red stripe over the picture edge on two of the prints. Three layers reveal themselves to the viewer here: first, the photograph, exposed on the printing plate and classically created by adding each color progressively; second, the division of the subject and the playful handling of the layers and distances to the edge of the picture; third, the integration of the lithographs into the specially printed wallpaper as an installative wall piece that precisely bursts the image boundaries. The photo was taken in the artist's Berlin apartment, the bouquet standing on a table. One might think it is a snapshot of an object in an abstract geometric space, only the reflection of the vase suggests an interior.

Shirana Shahbazi's works show unique perspectives, layers and colors. They are staged and constructed, but never manipulated. The artist is rarely if ever concerned with issues of representation or reproduction of reality – be it a space, a person or an object. Shirana Shahbazi is primarily concerned with spatial sequences and the choreography of pictorial environments as part of our world. Accordingly, it is not about the interpretation of a subject, but about the material, visible and tangible as a visual translation. Shahbazi always creates her own new visual reality with her works. It is primarily not important what we see, but that we see and how we see. She unites art and everyday life with new visual perspectives. Contemporary and new forms of perception matter, similar to the photography of the Russian avant-garde. Arrangements, abstraction, fascination and irritation of the gaze are approaches that play a constant role in Shahbazi's oeuvre. Her works are not limited to the two-dimensional medium of photography, the artist rather emancipates her photography by going beyond its frame and conceiving the works spatially as murals and installations. DK

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  • Sendetafel, 2021
  • Inkjet printing and monotype
  • Edition of: 25
  • Size of image: 50,00 cm x 36,00 cm
  • Size: 54,00 cm x 40,00 cm
  • Production: Beat & Susanne Etter, Zurich / Thomi Wolfensberger, Zurich
  • CHF 760.00
  • Sold
  • Inquiry
  • Inkjet print by Beat & Susanne Etter. Iris print by Thomi Wolfensberger. The iris prints are in different colors.

In the middle of the landscape, a large-format billboard transmits mysterious chromatic messages to the world. The Sendetafel edition broadcast panel by Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs, consisting of 25 serial unique pieces, combines two visual universes each produced with a different printing technique. The series was created as part of the ongoing process of their Futures work, in which the artists construct futuristic visions based on their own image archive. In 2020, they began cutting out pieces of their large-format negatives with a vector-controlled laser machine. In the empty spaces, they insert elements from other negatives to create new images. Buildings, cities and exhibition displays are recurring motifs. In the case of the Sendetafel, the cut-out field was not filled with a segment from another negative, but with a bright color gradient, a printing process called iris print. This surface was produced with a lithographic procedure, which follows a different logic than the inkjet interpretation of the rest of the image. The color gradient in iris printing consists of sheer ink and is the unique result of a sheet hitting a printing plate. Thus, not only two different printing techniques converge in the edition, but also two temporalities of the printing process. Each sheet of the Sendetafel edition features a different color combination and thus its own, partly poetic, partly surreal mood.

Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs' oeuvre centers on a critical as well as humorous examination of the medium of photography. With their works, they explore questions such as how reality is being depicted through photography and how certain forms of the artistic canon have become established over time. In their series The Great Unreal (2005-2009), created during several journeys through the American West, they appropriated the genre of road trip photography and defamiliarized the classic-looking landscapes by incorporating unexpected elements. Coupled with their interest in the formal language of photography is a fascination with the technical functioning of cameras. In their work As Long as it Photographs, it Must be a Camera (2011), for example, the artists constructed their own analog cameras out of a wide variety of objects such as turtle shells and books. In general, analog processes play an important role in the oeuvre of the artist duo. Thus, it is not surprising that the collage-like photomontages of their Futures work are not produced digitally on the computer, but manually. This can also be seen in their choice of the lithographic process to produce their Sendetafel series. VH

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  • Microbial Oasis: mutation 0, 2021
  • Screen printing on aluminium
  • Edition of: 22
  • Dimensions: 43,00 cm x 47,00 cm x 0,20 cm
  • Production: Lorenz Boegli, Müntschemier
  • CHF 960.00
  • available
  • Inquiry

Katja Novitskova's edition exemplifies her new body of work called Microbial Oasis. The seven-color fluorescent screen print is based on photographic representations of synthetic proteins and viral assemblages. The speculative depiction is created through the new StyleGAN2 – generative adversarial network – model, named after a machine learning framework, that can create new imagery out of image databases. Novitskova uses an open-source database of 12,000 images of molecular and cellular structures based on microscopic photography of actual proteins and viruses. The artwork created approximates a possible organic form, or to put it into more common language, it is an actual colorful and aesthetic deep fake. The visual representations of the artist's current project could not be more realistic, as medical research and biotechnology produce incredibly accurate knowledge on viruses, based on computational models and visual representations. Even though most of the generated information and visual material do not have an aesthetic aspect, Novitskova converts and re-creates this found imagery in borrowing and transforming it for her artistic exploration of the digital and microbial visual world.

Novitskova's interest lies in lifting the images from their natural habitat. In this she plays with the original transformation of organic bodies into images and digital data, to then reproduce them again on a larger scale. Therein, Novitskova is mapping the analyses of big data, genetic engineering as well as artificial intelligence in creating a new form of photography. In reassembling and recombining this imagery the artist creates potential worlds, that often are reminiscent of perfectly blended atmospheric and colorful pictures that we know from science documentaries. But beneath the surface there is the constant inquiry of human exploitation of other species, the flow and development of capital based on new scientific discoveries and possible interpretations. This implies the game of managing the oceans of signs we have to deal with every day. Tackling contemporary topics of digital possibilities, the artist scrutinizes in her work the direct relationship between the complex ecologies of image, information, matter, and value, which are not only bound to human understanding. It is about the work's poetic possibilities and about the necessity to disrupt the dichotomy between the perspective of human representation of forms engaging in a new system of vision. The hypothetical larger than life matter that enters our life is present not only in the invisible digital or neurobiological realm but also takes center stage in our visual perception and understanding of the world around us. DK

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  • Krakatau 1930/1, 2021
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 12
  • Size of image: 59,70 cm x 39,50 cm
  • Size: 76,00 cm x 55,50 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 640.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Krakatau 1930/2, 2021
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 12
  • Size of image: 59,70 cm x 39,50 cm
  • Size: 76,00 cm x 55,50 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 640.00
  • available
  • Inquiry

Two superimposed images form huge cloud formations that spread menacingly over the sea. Formal elements such as the rounded corners of the picture frames, the stains, scratches and other traces suggest at first glance that there is a connection here with older photographic images. In fact, Krakatau 1930/1 and Krakatau 1930/2 are cuttings from a roll of celluloid film held in the archives of the EYE Filmmuseum in Amsterdam. The reel is the original physical carrier of the 1930 Dutch expedition film Krakatau, which provides a glimpse into the lives of both native and European inhabitants of the Dutch Indies, the Dutch colony in the Indonesian archipelago at the time. The stills depicted show volcanic eruptions filmed from a boat and the resulting cloud formations. On closer inspection, it becomes apparent that the selected film locations are scene changes, whereby different film strips were manually glued together. While the splice is clearly recognizable as a bright line on one print, it is only distinguishable by a slight difference in color on the other. In the composition, the formlessness of the clouds contrasts with the clear black grid that frames the individual stills. Likewise, content and form diverge here: The film, which at the time was intended to reflect the imperialist power of the Netherlands, among other things, is today attenuated in its materiality and virtually exposed to slow decay

The examination of the relationship between image carrier and image motif runs like a thread through Alexandra Navratil's work. The question of what belongs to the depicted reality and what to the material image carrier is explored by the artist, for example, in the work Resurrections (2016), in which she worked with X-ray images. On these, pathological phenomena are difficult to distinguish from other traces on the radiograph. Navratil's interest in the material composition and, indeed, decomposition of the image carrier goes hand in hand with an interest in the history of film and photography in early modernism. Her works are based on lengthy research that often leads to groups of works and illuminates a theme from different perspectives and in different media. Related to the edition described here is the series All That Slides, Strikes, Rises and Falls (2015), in which film stills were woven into strips of fabric. The stills also take clouds as their subject, though in addition to volcanic clouds, they also include industrial steam formations and plumes of smoke over oil pits. While the textile work points to analogies in the serial production process of the textile and film industries, the medium of heliogravure chosen here nicely bridges the gap between one of the oldest photographic reproduction processes and early film history. VHTwo superimposed images form huge cloud formations that spread menacingly over the sea. Formal elements such as the rounded corners of the picture frames, the stains, scratches and other traces suggest at first glance that there is a connection here with older photographic images. In fact, Krakatau 1930/1 and Krakatau 1930/2 are cuttings from a roll of celluloid film held in the archives of the EYE Filmmuseum in Amsterdam. The reel is the original physical carrier of the 1930 Dutch expedition film Krakatau, which provides a glimpse into the lives of both native and European inhabitants of the Dutch Indies, the Dutch colony in the Indonesian archipelago at the time. The stills depicted show volcanic eruptions filmed from a boat and the resulting cloud formations. On closer inspection, it becomes apparent that the selected film locations are scene changes, whereby different film strips were manually glued together. While the splice is clearly recognizable as a bright line on one print, it is only distinguishable by a slight difference in color on the other. In the composition, the formlessness of the clouds contrasts with the clear black grid that frames the individual stills. Likewise, content and form diverge here: The film, which at the time was intended to reflect the imperialist power of the Netherlands, among other things, is today attenuated in its materiality and virtually exposed to slow decay

The examination of the relationship between image carrier and image motif runs like a thread through Alexandra Navratil's work. The question of what belongs to the depicted reality and what to the material image carrier is explored by the artist, for example, in the work Resurrections (2016), in which she worked with X-ray images. On these, pathological phenomena are difficult to distinguish from other traces on the radiograph. Navratil's interest in the material composition and, indeed, decomposition of the image carrier goes hand in hand with an interest in the history of film and photography in early modernism. Her works are based on lengthy research that often leads to groups of works and illuminates a theme from different perspectives and in different media. Related to the edition described here is the series All That Slides, Strikes, Rises and Falls (2015), in which film stills were woven into strips of fabric. The stills also take clouds as their subject, though in addition to volcanic clouds, they also include industrial steam formations and plumes of smoke over oil pits. While the textile work points to analogies in the serial production process of the textile and film industries, the medium of heliogravure chosen here nicely bridges the gap between one of the oldest photographic reproduction processes and early film history. VH

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  • Untitled, 2021
  • UV digital printing on aluminium
  • Edition of: Each unique
  • Dimensions: 50,80 cm x 43,30 cm x 2,00 cm
  • Production: Shahryar Nashat Studio, Los Angeles
  • CHF 2800.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Each plate has a different motif.

Shahryar Nashat's new object is based on a 3D scan of an elbow manipulating a sculpture with an invisible hand. The box-shaped sculpture that is seen in this work was presented in the artist's exhibition titled “They Come To Touch” at 8762 Holloway Drive in Los Angeles, a modernist storefront constructed by Rudolph Schindler. “They Come To Touch” is equally an apt description of Nashat's new work. The mechanical scanning of the camera captures the sculpture and this specific body part in a non-descript digital space, where a technical glitch occurs in the space between subject and object. The scanning device cannot differentiate between limb and object. Thus, the photo-representation is not real, but a technological failure of translation of form. As with most of Nashat's works, the space could be anywhere, the limb could be anyone's. The series of works consist of 17 unique pieces, as each print represents a different vanishing point and perspective. The colors resemble visceral unnatural tones, being in line with the artist's common color choices like puce, yellow and lilac. The work was primed and sealed with acrylic before the industrial UV print came on top, almost like a haptic relief. It can be considered a wall sculpture, not only because Nashat is mostly working with installations but more because the solid piece of aluminum is 2 cm thick and weighs around 10 kg.

The photograph is computer generated. It is a conversion of the corporeality and the incorporeality of the two objects as visual, mental and physical representations. In this playful approach Nashat's work tries to dialectically alienate but also reconcile technology, objecthood, and our bodily capabilities in new digital formats of photography. The work continues Nashat's exploration of bodies and his inquiry into the experience of digital and visual but also physical and intellectual spaces. It is a transformation of interior and exterior, technology and the body, nature and culture. The work can be read as an allegory of human desire to comprehend art objects and bodies in space in relation to their representation. As in his recent exhibitions Nashat explores how bodies and artworks can be seen, felt and perceived. Thereby, he often uses technological innovations serving as protheses extending the abilities and functions of the human form. Pieces of bodies, objects and life experiences show the contemporary fragmentation of consciousness and the body through technology and mediatization. The corporeality depicted seems to communicate to the viewer a constant longing for intimacy. We consider this corporeality to be organic and fragile objects that cannot be fully grasped. DK

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  • The World, 2021
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 20
  • Size of image: 30,00 cm x 19,50 cm
  • Size: 55,80 cm x 38,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 440.00
  • available
  • Inquiry

In his work entitled The World, Douglas Mandry reflects on our management of natural resources and, more particularly, on the displacement of materials for the construction industry. To illustrate a global trend, Mandry chose the group of artificial islands called “The World” near the coast of Dubai, whose construction required an unimaginable amount of sand to be dredged and piled up. This extravagant project gathers 300 islands, whose shape and arrangement are meant to resemble a map of the world. Each island can be purchased by private individuals or companies. The motif of Mandry's work is a detail from a photograph used in the advertising campaign for the project launched in 2003, which the artist realized as a two-color heliogravure. The printmaking technique and the particular color scheme give the work a classic, old-fashioned feel. The print evokes early aerial views of unspoiled nature, whereas the reality is the complete opposite: man-made landscapes still waiting to be populated. The nostalgic aesthetic suggests the predictable abandonment of these islands, as if they were nothing more than pre-programmed ruins of an overambitious building boom.

Whether in the form of found footage or his own works, photography is the central medium in Douglas Mandry's oeuvre. It serves the artist as a basis for addressing the influence of humans on the environment as well as the fragility of ecosystems. Mandry reflects on the absurdity of our interaction with nature in works such as the Monuments series (2020), in which he worked with black-and-white photographs of alpine expeditions from the 1930s. He printed the images as lithographs on modern geotextiles, which are laid on the glaciers during the summer to prevent them from melting. Other works in the Monuments series consist of photograms of glacier ice that Mandry brought back to his studio and placed directly on the light-sensitive photographic paper. Mandry's experimental approach to photography and classical printing techniques, as well as his use of unconventional image supports, allow him to consider landscape images from a new perspective and to question the concept of landscape itself. As in his work The World, the artist explores how the development of society and technology is changing our relationship with nature. VH

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  • Risk-Reduction Strategies for Law Enforcement; Tactics 65
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 20
  • Size of image: 20,50 cm x 14,50 cm
  • Size: 20,50 cm x 14,50 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 640.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Risk-Reduction Strategies for Law Enforcement; Critiques and Manuals 79, 2021
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 20
  • Size of image: 20,50 cm x 14,50 cm
  • Size: 38,00 cm x 28,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 640.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Risk-Reduction Strategies for Law Enforcement; Tactics 47, 2021
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 20
  • Size of image: 20,50 cm x 14,50 cm
  • Size: 38,00 cm x 28,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 640.00
  • available
  • Inquiry

Gardar Eide Einarsson created his first three heliogravures at master printer Arno Hassler's studio in Moutier. All three works show found imagery from a manual for law enforcement personnel. Einarsson expropriates the pages of the actual book, which are torn out and photographed for archival purposes. Each page and image work as a standalone but should also be comprehended in form of a complimentary series. What we see are three representations of control of public space: first, a tactics section showing three male officers in anti-riot gear, second, from a “critiques and manuals division” a motorcycle unit with a dozen officers in a training camp, third, another tactics segment showing a police or army training area in a stadium. In Einarsson's inquiry and play with American cultural iconography, one can see the symbolic form of state power. The raw expression of power and dominance is here also mimicked in the framing of the single sheets, which are normally reproduced in books in tens of thousands of editions as scholarly material. Einarsson takes this imagery out of context and emphasizes its visual form of symbolic violence, which can be read as a persiflage. As he says himself, if you look attentively at images from police manuals, they are not quite believable.

Einarsson's oeuvre can be characterized in terms of an edgy, black and white universe. In our contemporary sharing economy of images, it is the artist's recourse to popularize the mundane, unpopular, and normally unnoticed. He is interested in the fringes of society, which however still dominate the discourse of social power structures. His often-borrowed visuals and typefaces are reminiscent of the Picture's Generation, however, evolved in our current times and social critique. The importance in his work lies in uncovering contemporary ideology and violence underneath the layer of everyday life, no matter if it is a state pamphlet or a crime description. He questions cultural understandings and authority, with the found imagery that reveal their falseness themselves. Even if he often uses representations of the actual world, they often seem as a caricature or as a disturbing reminder of how we perceive certain given terms around us. His play with politics, sociology, and pop culture questions the ordinariness and the detachment with which we often approach social constructs, no matter if these are manuals, news or symbols. DK

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