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Newsletter

November 2016

  • Still 1 nach Jarman, 2016
  • Heliogravure/Aquatint
  • Edition of: 25
  • Size of image: 22,00 cm x 36,50 cm
  • Size: 55,50 cm x 45,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 520.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Still 3 nach Antonioni, 2016
  • Heliogravure/Aquatint
  • Edition of: 25
  • Size of image: 22,00 cm x 36,50 cm
  • Size: 55,50 cm x 45,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 520.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Still 4 nach Mizoguchi, 2016
  • Heliogravure/Aquatint
  • Edition of: 25
  • Size of image: 22,00 cm x 36,50 cm
  • Size: 55,50 cm x 45,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 520.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Still 5 nach Jarman, 2016
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 25
  • Size of image: 22,00 cm x 36,50 cm
  • Size: 55,50 cm x 45,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 520.00
  • available
  • Inquiry

Series

  • Alle 4 Arbeiten (2016)
  • Edition of: 25
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 1800.00
  • available
  • Inquiry

Films are an important source of inspiration for Uwe Wittwer. Templates for these new works, as well as for earlier, large groups of works, are film stills from classics of the last century. The films used here are by Derek Jarman (The Last of England, 1987), Michelangelo Antonioni (Blow Up, 1966) and Kenji Mizoguchi (Ugetsu monogatari, 1953). "The Last of England" reflects the mood that Jarman perceived in Great Britain in the 1980s. He paints a negative picture of the country: Drugs, violence, destruction permeate the film. Wittwer cross-fades the images with lines from the great poem "The Waste Land" by T.S. Eliot. Antonioni's film is about a photographer who believes he has discovered a crime in a photograph. Is the picture true? What is reality and what is imagination? These are questions that also run through the artistic work of Uwe Wittwer. Mizoguchi tells the story of a family in Japan in the 16th century. The father, a potter, values his craftsmanship more than his family - the story ends tragically. Among other things, the subject of ceramics reflects a strong personal interest of Uwe Wittwer. Historical, cultural and personal relationships weave through these pictures. Each one begins its own narrative: it is hinted at, cross-faded, alienated, associations are scattered - a new, poetic film rolls off.

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  • Sofa 1/2016
  • Etching
  • Edition of: 17
  • Size of image: 18,70 cm x 36,70 cm
  • Size: 32,00 cm x 38,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 360.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Sofa 2/2016
  • Etching
  • Edition of: 17
  • Size of image: 18,70 cm x 36,70 cm
  • Size: 32,00 cm x 38,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 360.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Sofa 3/2016
  • Etching
  • Edition of: 17
  • Size of image: 18,70 cm x 36,70 cm
  • Size: 32,00 cm x 38,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 360.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Sofa 4/2016
  • Etching
  • Edition of: 17
  • Size of image: 18,70 cm x 36,70 cm
  • Size: 32,00 cm x 38,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 360.00
  • available
  • Inquiry

Series

  • Alle 4 Arbeiten (1-4/2016)
  • Edition of: 17
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 1300.00
  • available
  • Inquiry

Sofas
In my work I am always concerned with the fine and also problematic dividing line between art and decoration. The inspiration for the etching series SOFAS comes from discount advertising, from the brochures that flutter into the house to advertise dubious pieces of furniture at reduced prices. The sofa is a central point of domestic life in the majority of households and thus opens a wide range of associations as an object. In this context, the work of art above the upholstery becomes a (more or less conscious) aesthetic statement, which is usually subordinated to the given sofa situation. Thanks to the work SOFAS, one (or even several) sofas can now be hung over the sofa, thus elegantly avoiding the difficulty of the decorative arrangement. (F.S.)

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  • Coquelicot I/2016
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 30
  • Size of image: 47,00 cm x 67,00 cm
  • Size: 47,00 cm x 67,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 600.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Coquelicot II/2016
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 30
  • Size of image: 47,00 cm x 67,00 cm
  • Size: 47,00 cm x 67,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 600.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Mimosas I/2016
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 30
  • Size of image: 47,00 cm x 67,00 cm
  • Size: 47,00 cm x 67,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 600.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Mimosas II/2016
  • Heliogravure
  • Edition of: 30
  • Size of image: 47,00 cm x 67,00 cm
  • Size: 47,00 cm x 67,00 cm
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 600.00
  • available
  • Inquiry

Series

  • Alle 4 Arbeiten (2016)
  • Edition of: 30
  • Production: Arno Hassler, Moutier
  • CHF 2200.00
  • available
  • Inquiry

"Through painting, things show themselves. They come into view. Schiess' painting is involved in the visibility and invisibility of things. In this case, the things are above all things of nature, not original nature, but the nature of the history of painting. The nature of the history of painting combines with the natural analogy of his own work. Therein lies one of the peculiarities of the work, the opposite of a definition." (Ulrich Loock, "Scheisse" in Adrian Schiess, Werke 1978-2012). The artist used 2 photographs from 2008, when he still had his studio in Mouans-Sartoux, as the basis for the present heliogravures. The two motifs "Coquelicot" and "Mimosas" appear again and again in his work over the years in various series and groups of works.

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  • < Agglo-Box >, 2016 (Unikate)
  • Painted and glazed porcelain, digital print transfer
  • Edition of: 21
  • Dimensions: 33,00 cm x 33,00 cm x 3,50 cm
  • Production: Eric Rihs, Galerie des Emibois
  • CHF 1200.00
  • Sold
  • Inquiry

For Aubry & Broquard everyday objects are the starting points for adaptations and abstractions. The appeal of their works lies in their play with the everyday and in caricature, good and bad taste. For the present edition the artists have chosen the theme "agglomeration". The topography, architecture and building materials of these places often appear very diverse and arbitrarily chosen. This mixture of "unsuitable" aesthetics interested them. A pizza with its very different and sometimes inappropriate combination of ingredients, freely scattered, makes one think of an agglomeration structure. The short-lived utility object of the pizza box is here transformed into a valuable object made of porcelain. Each work is a hand-painted unique specimen, equipped with additional digitally reproduced image fragments from different pizza boxes. The painting combines the two image levels and creates an illusion: What is painted? What is digitally reproduced? Similar to the principle of agglomeration - often a colourful mix without specific aesthetic demands - the design levels are mixed together to form a unique ceramic object.

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