DE | EN

Verena–Conzett–Strasse 7
8004 Zurich
Thu-Fri 14-18h, Sa 12-16h

T +41 44 241 53 00
info@edition-vfo.ch
Newsletter

Valérie Favre

* 18.8.1959 Evilard, lebt und arbeitet in Berlin www.valeriefavre.net

  • Als eine abstrakt Komposition über ein Zimmer für sich alleine 1
  • Silk-screen printing, gouache and collage (unique specimens)
  • Edition of: 30
  • Size: 42,00 cm x 29,50 cm
  • Production: UDK Siebdruck, Katja Borchert, Berlin
  • CHF 480.00
  • available
  • Inquiry
  • Als eine abstrakt Komposition über ein Zimmer für sich alleine 2
  • Silk-screen printing, gouache and collage (unique specimens)
  • Edition of: 30
  • Size: 42,00 cm x 29,50 cm
  • Production: UDK Siebdruck, Katja Borchert, Berlin
  • CHF 480.00
  • available
  • Inquiry

If Valérie Favre is known for making painting on large canvases vibrate through the superimposition of colours, it is the combination of graphic, textual and photographic elements in the work Als eine abstrakt Komposition über "Ein Zimmer für sich allein" ("A room for oneself") that makes the viewer tremble. But the painting has not disappeared. An abstract silkscreen composition reminiscent of the Constructivist works of Max Bill (1908-1994) surrounds four pages from an edition of Virginia Woolf's (1882-1941) novel A Room to Yourself. The pages arranged side by side are themselves the carriers of a second silkscreen print. This shows the viewer a photographic self-portrait of the artist, on which she holds a triangle in her hands. To look as much like Bill as possible, Favre photographed herself after shaving her hair very short and posed as a ballerina - minus the tutu.
Here the interplay of the various elements gives the motifs a new meaning, expressing the inequality of the sexes in terms of creative activities and freedom of expression. In her novel of 1929, Virginia Woolf shows the extent to which man's ability to create fictional worlds depends on material conditions. In her unique style, she discusses why so much literature has been written about women and so little has been written by women. Favre's reference to Bill combines the creative aspect with gender equality in the context of civil rights. If one reads the artist's pose as a decision to appropriate paper and space with the help of abstract forms, a direct reference to Swiss political history emerges: while Max Bill had been a member of the National Council since 1967, women in Switzerland were only granted the right to vote in 1971. Thus Valérie Favre's forms become political in an intimate way.
Populated by hybrid creatures and archetypes, Valérie Favre's paintings are characterized by a magical morbidity, a fragrant brutality, a grotesque delicacy. At the end of the 80s, Favre turned to painting after working in the theatre world. Since then, she has studied this medium in depth, using it as a means of reflecting on the world around us. Her works, which combine reduction and expressiveness, are characterized by a unique visual language.

Valérie Favre has been professor of painting at the Berlin University of the Arts since 2006. She was nominated for the Marcel Duchamp Prize in 2012. Numerous institutions have dedicated a monographic exhibition to her, including the Musée d'art et d'histoire in Neuchâtel (2017), the Kunsthalle van der Heydt in Wuppertal (2016), the Musée d'Art moderne et contemporain in Strasbourg (2015) and the Kunstmuseum Lucerne (2009).

+ more- less